30/01/2020

30/01/2020

By the Grace of G-d
Newtown Shul is the only synagogue in Sydney’s Inner West.  Newtown Shul’s activities are possible because of your kind generosity and we thank you for it.

Please consider becoming a member.

Should you wish to donate to Newtown Shul, you can always do so using the bank account details below. Please make sure to send an email to newtown@shul.org.au with a copy of the transaction confirmation.

Account Name: Newtown Synagogue INC, BSB: 032036, Account No: 960034


ATTENTION REQUIRED
Newtown Shul Membership 2019-2020

The NEW MEMBERSHIP DRIVE 2019 – 2020 is now on.

Please join up or renew your membership, thereby enabling Newtown Synagogue to keep on being unique, beautiful, and blessed.

PLEASE SIGN UP OR RENEW TODAY! Details are available on the following link. https://shul.org.au/membership-application/


Parshah in a Nutshell

Parshat Bo

Courtesy of Chabad.org

The last three of the Ten Plagues are visited on Egypt: a swarm of locusts devours all the crops and greenery; a thick, palpable darkness envelops the land; and all the firstborn of Egypt are killed at the stroke of midnight of the 15th of the month of Nissan.

G‑d commands the first mitzvah to be given to the people of Israel: to establish a calendar based on the monthly rebirth of the moon. The Israelites are also instructed to bring a “Passover offering” to G‑d: a lamb or kid goat is to be slaughtered, and its blood sprinkled on the doorposts and lintel of every Israelite home so that G‑d should pass over these homes when He comes to kill the Egyptian firstborn. The roasted meat of the offering is to be eaten that night together with matzah (unleavened bread) and bitter herbs.

The death of the firstborn finally breaks Pharaoh’s resistance, and he literally drives the children of Israel from his land. So hastily do they depart that there is no time for their dough to rise, and the only provisions they take along are unleavened. Before they go, they ask their Egyptian neighbours for gold, silver and garments—fulfilling the promise made to Abraham that his descendants would leave Egypt with great wealth.

The children of Israel are commanded to consecrate all firstborn and to observe the anniversary of the Exodus each year by removing all leaven from their possession for seven days, eating matzah, and telling the story of their redemption to their children. They are also commanded to wear tefillin on the arm and head as a reminder of the Exodus and their resultant commitment to G‑d.


Newtown Shul Weekly Friday Night Dinner

The Shabbat Dinner is the traditional focal point of every Jew’s week. We at Newtown Shul extend a warm welcome to all people to join us for a traditional Friday Night Dinner.

The Shabbat Dinner is held in the hall beside the Synagogue immediately after the 6:00pm Shabbat service.

The Shabbat Dinner is a joint project of Newtown Synagogue and Young Adult Chabad and operates by virtue of the generosity of donors and volunteers.

There is a suggested donation of $36 per person. To register for Shabbat dinner, please click here.

All of the food served at the dinner is prepared ‘by the people for the people’ with love. 

Cooking at Newtown Shul is fun, friendly and needs you! You don’t need to know how to cook and you don’t need to come every week! Just a willing pair of hands whenever you are available and a smile as great as the ones in this picture!


Shabbat Schedule

Friday

Friday Night Candle Lighting Time 7:44 PM

Pre-service L’chaim in the Hall 6:00 PM

Kabbalat Shabbat Service  in the Synagogue 6:30 PM

Shabbat Dinner book online here 7:30 PM

Saturday

Shabbat Morning Kabbalah Class in the Hall 9:00 AM

Shabbat morning service in the Synagogue 9:30 AM

Torah Reading 10:30 AM

Children’s Service in the Hall 11:00 AM

Rabbi’s Sermon and Choir 11:30 AM

Kiddush and Lunch in the Hall 12:30 PM

Shabbat Ends 8:41 PM


Torah Studies Class

Rabbi Eli Feldman gives a weekly Torah Studies class Live on Facebook every Thursday night at 8:30pm.

You can participate in the class by attending it in person or watching it online while it is broadcasting and ask questions in real-time. The broadcast is at www.facebook.com/rabbielifeldman


Thought for the Week

The Matzah Man

By Boruch Cohen (Courtesy of Youngadultchabad.org)

There is a superficial you and a spiritual you. The superficial you is made of the personality, habits, opinions and attitudes that are acquired over time; the spiritual you is the deep innate yearning of the soul to connect to community, mystical concepts and G‑d. In Kabbalah, the spiritual you is the real you, so a strong emphasis is made on deflating the superficial self in order to allow the deeper self to shine through.

Correspondingly, there is leavened bread and unleavened bread. Leavened bread is fat, inflated and full of itself; unleavened bread is flat and humble. That’s why the centerpiece of the Seder is matzah. At the Seder we relive the Exodus on a spiritual plane, freeing the soul from its slavery to the superficial self. Matzah, representing humility, the flattening of the self, the putting of one’s ego to the side, is central to the process. In Kabbalah, matzah is considered the conduit for the flow of the Seder’s redemptive light.

True humility starts with an insight: the humble recognition that the charming, witty, opinionated me is but a fat, inflated loaf of bread, while the real me is a conduit of divine strength, the inner me with which I light up the world. Humility is that which changes me from an everyday dough boy to a mystical Matzah Man.


Shabbos Chuckle

David Applebaum called his mother and announced excitedly that he had just met a young lady of excellent character named Rachel who interested him very much. What should he do?

Mrs Applebaum had an idea: “Why don’t you send her flowers, and on the card invite her to your apartment for a home-cooked meal? Show her that I raised a boy who knows his way around the kitchen!”

David thought this was a great idea, and a week later, Rachel came to dinner. Mrs Applebaum called the next day to see how things had gone.

“I was totally humiliated,” David moaned. “Rachel insisted on washing the dishes.”

“What’s wrong with that?” asked his mother.

“We hadn’t started eating yet.”

09/01/2020

09/01/2020

By the Grace of G-d
Newtown Shul is the only synagogue in Sydney’s Inner West.  Newtown Shul’s activities are possible because of your kind generosity and we thank you for it.

Please consider becoming a member.

Should you wish to donate to Newtown Shul, you can always do so using the bank account details below. Please make sure to send an email to newtown@shul.org.au with a copy of the transaction confirmation.

Account Name: Newtown Synagogue INC, BSB: 032036, Account No: 960034


Special Milestone Shabbat

Dear Friends,

I have just reached a special milestone – my 40th birthday.

Please join us at Shul this Friday night and or Shabbat day to say L’chaim in honour of this occasion! 🙂

In Jewish tradition, on a birthday one has special “Mazal” or enhanced energy. It is therefore a time to reflect and make positive resolutions in one’s life as well as give blessings to to others. Blessings given on a Birthday are said to be more potent.

I take this opportunity to bless you and your loved ones with health, happiness, meaningful relationships and financial abundance. May all of your positive dreams and desires be fulfilled and may all surprises be good. May Australia be blessed with rain, an immediate cessation of fires, and protection and safety to all those fighting, volunteering, and impacted by the fires.

May your endeavours be blessed by Hashem with success and may you find deep satisfaction, fulfillment and inspiration in the study of Torah and performance of Mitzvot. May the World be blessed with an end to war, hunger, and poverty and may we experience true and abiding peace with the coming of Moshiach.

With warm regards and blessings,

Shabbat Shalom!

Rabbi Eli Feldman


Jewish Communal Response to Bushfires

The NSW Jewish Board of Deputies together with Stand Up: Jewish Commitment to a Better World, have so far raised $590,000 for bushfire relief. The funds will be disbursed shortly.

Given the increased and ongoing severity of the fires, the Board of Deputies has established a new campaign with Stand Up for further donations for dispersal to those affected in NSW and elsewhere. The new campaign can be found here: https://www.givenow.com.au/standup-bushfire-appeal

We encourage those who are able to give to do so. All donations over $2 are tax-deductible.

Furthermore, a national Jewish response to the disaster is being coordinated by the ECAJ. Click here for their statement on the bushfire response.


Parshah in a Nutshell

Parshat Vayechi

Courtesy of Chabad.org

Jacob (Yaakov in Hebrew) was the third and final of the Jewish Patriarchs. Jacob lived in the Land of Canaan, Haran, and Egypt. Unlike Abraham and Isaac, Jacob’s entire family remained righteous—his 12 sons became the 12 tribes of Israel, the Shevatim.

The Jewish Sages call Jacob the “favourite” of the Patriarchs. After Jacob successfully fought off an angel, G‑d named him Israel(Yisrael in Hebrew)—the name that the entire Jewish people became known by as “Bnei Yisrael,” the Nation of Israel.
Check out these in-depth summaries of Jacob’s life and times.


Newtown Shul Weekly Friday Night Dinner

The Shabbat Dinner is the traditional focal point of every Jew’s week. We at Newtown Shul, extend a warm welcome to all people to join us for a traditional Friday Night Dinner.

The Shabbat Dinner is held in the hall beside the Synagogue immediately after the 6:00pm Shabbat service.

The Shabbat Dinner is a joint project of Newtown Synagogue and Young Adult Chabad and operates by virtue of the generosity of donors and volunteers.

There is a suggested donation of $36 per person. To make a tax-deductible donation for the Shabbat dinners, please click here.

All of the food served at the dinner is prepared ‘by the people for the people’ with love. 

Cooking at Newtown Shul is fun, friendly and needs you! You don’t need to know how to cook and you don’t need to come every week! Just a willing pair of hands whenever you are available and a big smile.


Shabbat Schedule

Friday

Friday Night Candle Lighting Time 7:52 PM

Pre-service L’chaim in the Hall 6:00 PM

Kabbalat Shabbat Service  in the Synagogue 6:30 PM

Shabbat Dinner book online here 7:30 PM

Saturday

Shabbat Morning Kabbalah Class in the Hall 9:00 AM

Shabbat morning service in the Synagogue 9:30 AM

Torah Reading 10:30 AM

Children’s Service in the Hall 11:00 AM

Rabbi’s Sermon and Choir 11:30 AM

Kiddush and Lunch in the Hall 12:30 PM

Shabbat Ends 8:53 PM


Thought for the Week

Life Never Ends

By Yitschak Meir Kagan (Courtesy of Youngadultchabad.org)

And Jacob finished commanding his sons, and he gathered up his feet into the bed, and expired, and was gathered unto his people.

Genesis 49:33

The Torah does not state “he died,” and the sages declared, “Our father Jacob did not die… just as his children are alive, so is he alive.”

What forms the basis for the love and communion between two dear friends, between husband and wife or between children and their parent? Not the physical body, which is flesh and bones and guts, but the characteristics of the spirit, the true essence of man. It is only that man communicates with his fellow through the body and its limbs. Through his eyes, ears, hands, organs of speech, etc., man gives expression to his thoughts, feelings, and the characteristics of his spirit, and (obviously) it is they, not the bodily tools of expression, that constitute his true essence and being.

It follows that in the World of Truth (the spiritual hereafter) the soul of the departed has particularly great pleasure on seeing the members of his family recover from the tragedy, come to themselves, make every effort to set their lives in good order, and act as an inspiration and encouragement to others.

A bullet, a shell-fragment or a sickness can damage the body, but they cannot hurt or affect the soul. They can cause death, but death is only a separation between body and soul. The soul continues to live (eternally); it continues to have a connection with the family, especially with those who were especially dear and beloved. It shares in their distress, and rejoices at every joyous event in the family. It is only that the members of the family, living in this earthly world, cannot see the soul’s reaction with their flesh-and-blood eyes, nor can they touch it or feel it with their hands—for the physical connection has been broken.

The soul of the departed derives especial satisfaction from seeing his children being reared in the proper Torah-spirit, free of any feelings of despair or depression, G‑d forbid, but rather (as the traditional expression goes) ‘…to raise them to Torah, to matrimony and to good deeds.’

From a letter of the Rebbe written to a war widow in Israel.


Shabbos Chuckle

Miriam begins to notice that whenever her 5-year-old daughter Sarah is asked her name, she answers, “I’m Mrs Freedman’s daughter.”

So one day, just before bedtime, Miriam says to Sarah, “Bubbeleh, whenever anyone asks you what your name is, you shouldn’t say, ‘I’m Mrs Freedman’s daughter.’ You should proudly say, ‘My name is Sarah.’ Sarah is such a beautiful name – the Torah even tells us that another lovely Sarah was the wife of Abraham and the mother of Isaac.”

“OK, mommy,” says Sarah.

Later that week, a Rabbi is visiting Sarah’s class at school and as soon as he sees Sarah, he goes over to her and says, “Hello, aren’t you Mrs Freedman’s daughter?”

“I thought I was,” replies Sarah, “but my mommy says I’m not.”


ATTENTION REQUIRED
Newtown Shul Membership 2019-2020

The NEW MEMBERSHIP DRIVE 2019 – 2020 is now on.

Please join up or renew your membership, thereby enabling Newtown Synagogue to keep on being unique, beautiful, and blessed.

PLEASE SIGN UP OR RENEW TODAY! Details are available on the following link.
https://shul.org.au/membership-application/

28/11/2019

28/11/2019

By the Grace of G-d
Newtown Shul is the only synagogue in Sydney’s Inner West.  Newtown Shul’s activities are possible because of your kind generosity and we thank you for it.

Please consider becoming a member.

Should you wish to donate to Newtown Shul, you can always do so using the bank account details below. Please make sure to send an email to newtown@shul.org.au with a copy of the transaction confirmation.

Account Name: Newtown Synagogue INC, BSB: 032036, Account No: 960034


ATTENTION REQUIRED
Newtown Shul Membership 2019-2020

The NEW MEMBERSHIP DRIVE 2019 – 2020 is now on.

Please join up or renew your membership, thereby enabling Newtown Synagogue to keep on being unique, beautiful, and blessed.

PLEASE SIGN UP OR RENEW TODAY! Details are available on the following link. https://shul.org.au/membership-application/


Parshah in a Nutshell

Parshat Toldot

Courtesy of Chabad.org

Isaac and Rebecca endure twenty childless years until their prayers are answered and Rebecca conceives. She experiences a difficult pregnancy as the “children struggle inside her”; G‑d tells her that “there are two nations in your womb,” and that the younger will prevail over the elder.

Esau emerges first; Jacob is born clutching Esau’s heel. Esau grows up to be “a cunning hunter, a man of the field”; Jacob is “a wholesome man,” a dweller in the tents of learning. Isaac favours Esau; Rebecca loves Jacob. Returning exhausted and hungry from the hunt one day, Esau sells his birthright (his rights as the firstborn) to Jacob for a pot of red lentil stew.

In Gerar, in the land of the Philistines, Isaac presents Rebecca as his sister, out of fear that he will be killed by someone coveting her beauty. He farms the land, reopens the wells dug by his father Abraham, and digs a series of his own wells: over the first two there is strife with the Philistines, but the waters of the third well are enjoyed in tranquillity.

Esau marries two Hittite women. Isaac grows old and blind and expresses his desire to bless Esau before he dies. While Esau goes off to hunt for his father’s favourite food, Rebecca dresses Jacob in Esau’s clothes, covers his arms and neck with goatskins to simulate the feel of his hairier brother, prepares a similar dish, and sends Jacob to his father. Jacob receives his father’s blessings for “the dew of the heaven and the fat of the land” and mastery over his brother. When Esau returns and the deception is revealed, all Isaac can do for his weeping son is to predict that he will live by his sword and that when Jacob falters, the younger brother will forfeit his supremacy over the elder.

Jacob leaves home for Charan to flee Esau’s wrath and to find a wife in the family of his mother’s brother, Laban. Esau marries a third wife—Machalath, the daughter of Ishmael.


Shabbat Project Challah Bake

30 ladies from Sydney’s Inner West congregated at Newtown Synagogue on Wednesday 11 November, in honour of the Shabbat Project Challah Bake, one of many around the world. The event marks a global effort to keep and honour Shabbat, through numerous meals and festivities.

Ladies were greeted with an elegant array of refreshments, and tables set up with personalised Newtown Synagogue Challah Bake Challah Guides and Shabbat Project aprons.

Newtown Rebbetzin Elka Feldman inspired participants with words of wisdom relating to the various components of challah. Ladies made their own challah from scratch, enlightened by insights shared by Rebbetzin Elka. Yeast, for example, represents joy. It froths and bubbles, like a joyous person. Similarly, sugar is symbolic of trust and faith in G-d. When we trust in G-d, we have an added sweetness.

Shaharit Shmuel-Hay made her ‘tried and true’ recipe with the crowd, after many years of successful challah baking. Shaharit offered tips for challah braiding par excellence. She shared her great tips, like the value in using bread improver, and was quick and efficient in directing the ladies in making challah with her mastery.

The taking challah ceremony was auspicious, with ladies sharing their personal requests. Prayers for Israel and for the bush fires were extended, as well as well-wishing for family and loved ones.

Participants enjoyed an uplifted, meaningful and laugh-filled evening, thanks to our gracious hostess Rebbetzin Elka, and Shaharit. Special thanks to Talia Dayman for assisting in coordinating the event and all of the volunteers who helped out before, during and after the event!


Newtown Shul Weekly Friday Night Dinner

The Shabbat Dinner is the traditional focal point of every Jew’s week. We at Newtown Shul extend a warm welcome to all people to join us for a traditional Friday Night Dinner.

The Shabbat Dinner is held in the hall beside the Synagogue immediately after the 6:00pm Shabbat service.

The Shabbat Dinner is a joint project of Newtown Synagogue and Young Adult Chabad and operates by virtue of the generosity of donors and volunteers.

There is a suggested donation of $36 per person. To register for Shabbat dinner, please click here.

All of the food served at the dinner is prepared ‘by the people for the people’ with love. 

Cooking at Newtown Shul is fun, friendly and needs you! You don’t need to know how to cook and you don’t need to come every week! Just a willing pair of hands whenever you are available and a smile as great as the ones in this picture!

Thank you to Diana, Elinor and Ivan who were at Shul cooking for Shabbat dinner a few weeks ago.

Torah Studies Class

Rabbi Eli Feldman gives a weekly Torah Studies class Live on Facebook every Thursday night at 8:30pm.

You can participate in the class while it is broadcasting and ask questions in real-time. The broadcast is at www.facebook.com/rabbielifeldman

Alternatively, you can watch the replay of this week’s class below:

Torah Studies Topic – “Prayer: why is it important?”Feel free to ask questions in the comments section during the broadcast and I will endeavor to answer them during the class 😊

Posted by Rabbi Eli Feldman on Thursday, 28 November 2019

Shabbat Schedule

Friday

Friday Night Candle Lighting Time 7:31 PM

Pre-service L’chaim in the Hall 6:00 PM

Kabbalat Shabbat Service  in the Synagogue 6:30 PM

Shabbat Dinner book online here 7:30 PM

Saturday

Shabbat Morning Kabbalah Class in the Hall 9:00 AM

Shabbat morning service in the Synagogue 9:30 AM

Torah Reading 10:30 AM

Children’s Service in the Hall 11:00 AM

Rabbi’s Sermon and Choir 11:30 AM

Kiddush and Lunch in the Hall 12:30 PM

Shabbat Ends 8:33 PM


Thought for the Week

A Sheep in a Wolf’s Clothing

By Elisha Greenbaum (Courtesy of Youngadultchabad.org)

I’ve often wondered why Rebecca and Jacob went through all that fuss and bother to surreptitiously engineer that Isaac’s blessings go to Jacob and not his older brother Esau.

On Rebecca’s advice, Jacob waited till Esau had left the house to go hunting. Rebecca then cooked up a meal of goat meat – to taste like the venison that Esau was sure to bring – and then sheared the goats’ skins so Jacob could wrap them around his arms to simulate hairiness, and even asked Jacob to don his brother’s clothes

Isaac was blind, so when Jacob finally managed to creep into the room he had to imitate his brother’s tone of voice and disposition, and then he prevaricated, dissembled and stretched the truth so that his aging father would not catch on.

Even after successfully receiving the blessings, for decades to come, he lived in fear of Esau’s revenge.

Why bother? Why didn’t he and his mother just march openly into Isaac’s room, bring proof of Esau’s wickedness and convince Isaac that Jacob was the more worthy candidate in the first place?

You Don’t Have to Be Holy to Be Blessed

When I visit people in the hospital as part of my pastoral duties, I often hear variations on a common theme: “Rabbi, I’m praying, but I don’t really know if I deserve a miracle, after all, I’m not very religious…” Others are even less sanguine; they just assume that their lack of Jewish knowledge or observance to date precludes them
from ever receiving G‑d’s favor.

Perhaps it was to dispel this attitude that Rebecca forced Jacob to go through the whole charade. Sure, he could have walked identifiably into his father’s study, dressed all in white, exuding nobility and religiosity, and claimed his rightful blessings. But the unmistakable message for the future would be that only the Jacobs among us deserve to be blessed.

But that’s not good enough for a true Yiddishe mama (Jewish mother). Rebecca wanted to ensure merit for all Jews, for all generations. By deliberately going down-market and dressing Jacob in Esau’s clothing, she demonstrated that every one of us, even those who currently look and act like Esau, are equally deserving of our Father’s blessings.


Shabbos Chuckle

Shmuli Horowitz was having a garage sale and invited some of his neighbours to sell their wares at his place as well. One of Shmuli’s neighbours, Brent Mathews, took four tires over and was asking $30 a piece. Brent needed to leave for a few minutes, so he asked Shmuli to watch the tires for me.

“Sure,” Shmuli said, “but if someone offers less, how low are you willing to go?”

“Try your best for more, but I guess I’d be willing to accept $15,” Brent said, and left.

When Brent returned, his tires were gone. “How much did you get for them?” Brent asked excitedly.

“Fifteen dollars each.”

“Who bought them?”

“I did!”

08/11/2019

08/11/2019

By the Grace of G-d
Newtown Shul is the only synagogue in Sydney’s Inner West.  Newtown Shul’s activities are possible because of your kind generosity and we thank you for it.

Please consider becoming a member.

Should you wish to donate to Newtown Shul, you can always do so using the bank account details below. Please make sure to send an email to newtown@shul.org.au with a copy of the transaction confirmation.

Account Name: Newtown Synagogue INC, BSB: 032036, Account No: 960034


ATTENTION REQUIRED
Newtown Shul Membership 2019-2020

The NEW MEMBERSHIP DRIVE 2019 – 2020 is now on.

Please join up or renew your membership, thereby enabling Newtown Synagogue to keep on being unique, beautiful, and blessed.

PLEASE SIGN UP OR RENEW TODAY! Details are available on the following link. https://shul.org.au/membership-application/


Shabbat Project


Parshah in a Nutshell

Parshat Lech Lecha

Courtesy of Chabad.org

G‑d speaks to Abram, commanding him, “Go from your land, from your birthplace and from your father’s house, to the land which I will show you.” There, G‑d says, he will be made into a great nation. Abram and his wife, Sarai, accompanied by his nephew Lot, journey to the land of Canaan, where Abram builds an altar and continues to spread the message of a one G‑d.

A famine forces the first Jew to depart for Egypt, where beautiful Sarai is taken to Pharaoh’s palace; Abram escapes death because they present themselves as brother and sister. A plague prevents the Egyptian king from touching her, and convinces him to return her to Abram and to compensate the brother-revealed-as-husband with gold, silver and cattle.

Back in the land of Canaan, Lot separates from Abram and settles in the evil city of Sodom, where he falls captive when the mighty armies of Chedorlaomer and his three allies conquer the five cities of the Sodom Valley. Abram sets out with a small band to rescue his nephew, defeats the four kings, and is blessed by Malki-Zedek the king of Salem (Jerusalem).

G‑d seals the Covenant Between the Parts with Abram, in which the exile and persecution (galut) of the people of Israel is foretold, and the Holy Land is bequeathed to them as their eternal heritage.

Still childless ten years after their arrival in the Land, Sarai tells Abram to marry her maidservant Hagar. Hagar conceives, becomes insolent toward her mistress, and then flees when Sarai treats her harshly; an angel convinces her to return, and tells her that her son will father a populous nation. Ishmael is born in Abram’s eighty-sixth year.

Thirteen years later, G‑d changes Abram’s name to Abraham (“father of multitudes”), and Sarai’s to Sarah (“princess”), and promises that a son will be born to them; from this child, whom they should call Isaac (“will laugh”), will stem the great nation with which G‑d will establish His special bond. Abraham is commanded to circumcise himself and his descendants as a “sign of the covenant between Me and you.” Abraham immediately complies, circumcising himself and all the males of his household.


Mazal Tov

Mazaltov Paul Davidov on the occasion of his Barmitzvah this coming Shabbat
9 November.

The congregation is invited to participate in the service this Shabbat morning and celebrate at the Kiddush Lunch.


Torah Studies Class

Rabbi Eli Feldman gives a weekly Torah Studies class Live on Facebook every Thursday night at 8:30pm.

You can participate in the class while it is broadcasting and ask questions in real-time. The broadcast is at www.facebook.com/rabbielifeldman

Alternatively, you can watch the replay of this week’s class below:

Torah Studies Topic: “Reclaiming the Love – How Good Relationships Get Even Better”Feel free to ask questions in the comments section during the broadcast and I will endeavor to answer them during the class!

Posted by Rabbi Eli Feldman on Thursday, 7 November 2019

Newtown Shul Weekly Friday Night Dinner

The Shabbat Dinner is the traditional focal point of every Jew’s week. We at Newtown Shul extend a warm welcome to all people to join us for a traditional Friday Night Dinner.

The Shabbat Dinner is held in the hall beside the Synagogue immediately after the 6:00pm Shabbat service.

The Shabbat Dinner is a joint project of Newtown Synagogue and Young Adult Chabad and operates by virtue of the generosity of donors and volunteers.

There is a suggested donation of $36 per person. To register for Shabbat dinner, please click here.

All of the food served at the dinner is prepared ‘by the people for the people’ with love. 

Cooking at Newtown Shul is fun, friendly and needs you! You don’t need to know how to cook and you don’t need to come every week! Just a willing pair of hands whenever you are available and a smile as great as the ones in this picture!

Thank you to Diana, Elinor and Ivan who were at Shul cooking for Shabbat dinner a few weeks ago.

Shabbat Schedule

Friday

Friday Night Candle Lighting Time 7:11 PM

Pre-service L’chaim in the Hall 6:00 PM

Kabbalat Shabbat Service  in the Synagogue 6:30 PM

Shabbat Dinner book online here 7:30 PM

Saturday

Shabbat Morning Kabbalah Class in the Hall 9:00 AM

Shabbat morning service in the Synagogue 9:30 AM

Torah Reading 10:30 AM

Children’s Service in the Hall 11:00 AM

Rabbi’s Sermon and Choir 11:30 AM

Kiddush and Lunch in the Hall 12:30 PM

Shabbat Ends 8:10 PM


Thought for the Week

Smile for the Camera

By Elisha Greenbaum (Courtesy of Youngadultchabad.org)

I’ve got a new shtick that I’ve been doing lately. When I help someone to put on tefillin, I try to immortalize the moment for posterity. After he’s finished praying, while still strapped up, I pull out my iPhone and ask him to pose for a photo. If his family are there at the time, even better; I get them to all cluster around their husband or father and smile for the camera.

I’m not collecting trophies or notches on my belt; the real reason I go to this trouble is so I can then email the proud snaps to the people in question.

They love it. They show the photos to their grandparents and post them on their Facebook walls. They forward the happy shot for their wives’ approval and remind me of the moment the next time we meet. Hopefully, this photo will start a conversation, and their kids will remember that “those black boxes that Daddy put on at the shopping centre” are relevant to their lives as well.

It’s the same with every mitzvah that people accept on themselves. People don’t just put up a sukkah for their own family; they invite their friends to come by and share the fun.

As soon as a new family start coming to shul regularly, they start nudging their extended family to join. Just last week someone was telling me that the best part of owning a lulav and etrog set was getting to watch his 8-year-old daughter teach her whole class how to shake it as well.

If you think about it, it’s this model that has ensured that brit, the most “successful” mitzvah of all, continues to be so universally accepted. On the face of things, it just doesn’t make sense. Of all the 613 commandments that G‑d gifted us with, submitting your 8-day-old son to elective surgery would have to be the single most difficult act that one can imagine volunteering for. Why would millions of otherwise rational parents have proven so dedicated to such a hard act to follow?

From a mystical perspective, we explain that brit is a covenant. When G‑d first commanded Abraham to circumcise his son, He promised him: “I will make a covenant with you forever and multiply you exceedingly (Genesis 17:2).” A covenant cannot be broken. A covenant cannot be abnegated or abrogated. A covenant is forever. You are hard-wired to circumcision; your soul won’t allow you to opt out.

However, even on a more prosaic level, we can still understand why people keep on circumcising. If every boy has one, then circumcision has become the norm. It’s no longer a matter for debate or conjecture; it’s just a given that a Jew needs a circumcision and a Jewish parent will circumcise his or her son. They may not enjoy it, they may even dread the prospect, but they’ll do it because that’s just what we do and we can’t imagine any other possibility.

The more often that people do something, the more normal it becomes. When one Jew shakes a lulav and etrog or straps on tefillin in public, it normalizes the experience for others. When you see your neighbour has candles shining in her window this Friday, there’s a far greater likelihood that your house will soon also be lit up with the radiance of Shabbat.

In addition to their innate worth as independent connectors to G‑d, mitzvahs are contagious. Judaism is not just meaningful, it’s fun. When we do the right thing and we show that we’re proud to do so, then we inspire our families and friends to buy in.

And together, we will change the world.


Shabbos Chuckle

Friday afternoon, 5-year-old Moishie Sherman came in while his parents were setting the table for Shabbos Dinner. Quite surprisingly, Moishie asked if he could help. His mother said, “No, but I appreciate your asking.”

Little Moishie responded, “Well, I appreciate you saying no.”


Pictures and Videos from Our Recent 100th Anniversary Celebration

Video made by Richard Weinstein. View at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JrPhjvdNAM&feature=youtu.be
Video by Melanie Morningstar. View at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-iDw7oSR6U&feature=youtu.be

Newtown Synagogue's 100th anniversary celebration and new Torah presented by Sir Frank Lowy AC.

Posted by Newtown Shul on Saturday, 26 October 2019
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